Date:
Aug 17, 2020
Written By:Victoria Palmer
Victoria Palmer
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When you think LED, what springs to mind? Fairy lights? Lamps? But did you know that it’s also great for certain skincare issues?

So, what is LED therapy, what’s it used for, and what are the benefits? Let's take a look at the different types of LED light therapy, and how the different colours work to improve skin issues.

Well, first things first - just in case you’re wondering - LED stands for light emitting diode. LED therapy was, incredibly, originally used by NASA for healing and recovery in space. But it was so successful that it soon became used in the beauty and aesthetics industry - hey, if astronauts are using it, it must be great!

LED red light for skin rejuvenation

Red light has shown to be extremely effective at repairing damaged skin. But how does it do this? Well, it helps promote growth factors that repair skin damage. As a consequence, collagen is boosted. And we all know what that means...softer, smoother-looking skin. And, get this - it's great for reducing the signs of ageing, making skin look younger. Fine lines be gone!

The LED red light treatment only takes around 20 minutes, and you can get on with whatever you like afterwards. You may not notice dramatic results after your first session, so for best results, practitioners recommend 2-3 sessions per week to start with.

You may be wondering, “does LED red light therapy hurt?” But, actually, there is no pain with LED red light therapy, and no use of anaesthetic, which is, well, fabulous.

LED blue light for acne

Where red light is great for rejuvenating skin, blue light works well on acne-prone skin. The amazing thing about this LED treatment is that it works on the acne bacteria present on the skin (pow!), and helps reduce the inflammation that occurs with acne (boom!) as well as minimising spots (bang!). It can be used on the face, neck and décolletage, as well as the hands.

The treatment takes just 20 minutes, and for best results, a course of treatments is generally recommended - that’s around 3 times a week over a two week period. But, of course, this can vary from person to person. Speaking to your practitioner will help you manage your expectations.

What other LED colours are there?

Blue and red are the most common types of LED therapy that you’ll find if you go to have your treatment done at a clinic. However, there are other colours too that you will often find on at-home masks. Let’s take a look at what these do…

LED amber light therapy for redness

Amber light is another colour used in LED light therapy due to its amazing abilities to help skin. So, when would you use this colour? Well, amber light therapy is used for calming redness in skin issues such as rosacea and those pesky spider veins, and it’s perfect for sensitive skin thanks to its ability to soothe. Not only this, but amber light therapy is also great for encouraging lymphatic flow, getting rid of any waste to make the skin healthier and brighter, while also increasing cellular growth.

LED green light therapy for evening out skin tone

If you’re struggling with pigmentation issues, green light therapy is a great way to even out skin tone - think hyperpigmentation, brown spots, freckles and age spots. Green light prevents the production of excess melanin, resulting in less pigmentation on the skin’s surface, giving a brighter, more even skin tone. It even targets dark circles!

LED therapy at home vs in a clinic

With so many at-home LED therapy masks now available, you may wonder what’s best - an at-home LED therapy mask or going to a clinic? But, in reality, while some do provide great results, they will never be as intensive as the ones you find in a clinic. Also, a fully trained practitioner will understand exactly where to target, if it’s likely to work for you, how long to use it for and how many sessions should be needed to see a noticeable difference.

Interested in finding out more? Search for a practitioner in your area specialising in LED therapy.